Blog

The Impact of Green Buildings on Cognitive Function

NEW STUDY: BETTER THINKING, BETTER HEALTH IN GREEN-CERTIFIED BUILDINGS

Benefits may extend beyond workday to include improved sleep quality

Considering all the time we spend at work, have you ever wondered if the building you are working in is healthy? Or, could make you think better, or be more productive?

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REGISTER for 2016 Greenbuild International Conference in LA

Registration is open for the 2016 Greenbuild International Conference & Expo, taking place at the Los Angeles Convention Center, Oct. 5-7.

Join industry leaders, experts and green building professionals dedicated to sustainable building to share ideals, network, take in inspiring speakers and attend curated education sessions. Register today at http://ow.ly/QbXa300Tz2Y

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Setting High Standards: LEED Gold Now the Rule at UConn

The Board of Trustees recently raised UConn’s minimum green building standard from LEED Silver to LEED Gold, taking another step toward achieving carbon neutrality by 2050 and securing other environmental goals.

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Energize CT Accepting Entries for 7th Annual Zero Energy Challenge

Participants compete to prove high efficiency homes are achievable with current technology.

NEW BRITAIN, Conn. – June 9, 2016 – Energize Connecticut partners, Eversource, The United Illuminating Company (UI), Southern Connecticut Gas and Connecticut Natural Gas are now accepting entries for the 7th annual Connecticut Zero Energy Challenge (ZEC), a statewide design/build competition for single and multi-family homes. 

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CT weighs tougher building codes to combat climate change

In April, Malloy issued an executive order instructing the DAS, DEEP and the Insurance Department to work with the Office of the State Building Inspector to ensure that the next revision to the State Building Code contains standards that increase the resiliency of new and renovated homes and buildings.

Malloy hasn't proposed anything specific, but said measures to consider include sealing seams in roof decks to guard against water infiltration if shingles blow off; stronger tie-downs of roofs to building structures; and impact-resistant glass in high-wind areas.Many measures to make buildings more resilient are relatively inexpensive, he said. He also cited research that every $1 spent on resiliency measures can save $4 in insurance claims.

Jessie Stratton, director of policy for DEEP, said talks among state agencies would lead to a code that is more appropriate for the changing climate. DEEP is concerned about rising sea levels and more intense storms, particularly stronger nor'easters, she said.

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